Human Resources Management for Tourism Hospitality and Events (HLT5046)

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Aims: HRM for Tourism, Hospitality, and Events aims to provide a broad perspective on the contemporary business issues and external context shaping HR activities and HR professional practice within organizations, and the forces shaping the HRM agenda. The module further aims to provide an examination of the diversity of HR issues and the primary role and key functions of HR with reference to models, theories, and concepts of HRM.

Learning outcomes: By the end of the module, students will be able to:-

  1. Identify and evaluate the key business issues and external environmental factors that impact upon HR strategy and activities within organizations facilitate change.
  2. Analyze key models, theories and concepts of HRM and explore the contribution of HR to issues of business ethics, governance and accountability.
  3. Delineate the methodological and problem-solving based processes that the manager uses as part of their HR role in Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management.

Indicative content

  • External context: demographical, social, technological and environmental changes and the nature of work; globalization and markets; international factors; UK/EU policy and legislation; stakeholders and customers.
  • Models, theories and concepts of HRM;
  • Role of HR and the main functions and specialist areas of HR
    • People resourcing,
    • Employee relations.
    • Performance management
    • Rewards
    • Learning and development

Required reading

  • Beardwell, I. and Thompson. (2014) Human Resource Management. A Contemporary Perspective. 7th Ed. London: Pitman (Available as an E Book)
  • Torrington, D; Taylor, S; Hall, L. (2014) Human Resource Management. Harlow: Prentice Hall.

Recommended reading

  • Armstrong, M. and Taylor, S. (2014) Handbook of HRM Practice. London: Kogan Page (Available as an E Book)
  • Bratton, J; Gold, J. (2012) Human Resource Management Theory and Practice. 5th ed. Basingstoke: Macmillan.
  • Marchington, M; Wilkinson, A. (2008) Human Resource Management at Work: People Management and Development. London: CIPD.
  • Van der Wagen, L. and White, L. (2014) Human Resource Management for Events. 2nd ed. Oxford: Routledge

The following journals contain papers relevant to this module:

  • British Journal of Industrial Relations
  • Human Resource Management Journal
  • IDS Employment Services
  • International Journal of Human Resource Management
  • Journal of Employee Relations
  • Personnel Today
  • Personnel Review

Lecture Program

Lecture 1

-Introduction to module: general overview, delivery method, structure and introduction to assessments.

  • Nature and context of HRM

Lecture 2

-Theories of HRM

-Decades of job averts

-Assignment brief

Lecture 3

-Changing nature of work

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 4

-Human Resource Planning Processes

Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 5

Job analysis and design

-Planning for the future

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 6

-Recruitment and selection 1

-The Specifications

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 7

-Recruitment and selection 2

-Effective recruitment

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 8

-Performance management

-The Recruitment Drive

-Selection Methods

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 9

-Employee Relations

-Appraisal in Adversity

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 10

-Equality and diversity

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 11

-Induction and socialization

-Equal Opportunities for All

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 12

-Training and development

-Training Techniques

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 13

-Management training and development.

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 14

-Rewards systems: Benefits packages in the Economic climate.

-Making Incentives work.

-Case study discussion and tutorial questions

Lecture 15

-Codes of conduct and discipline

-Managing turnover and staff retention

-Redundancy and termination

Assessment 1 – Individual Essay 2000 words (50%)

Submission deadlines:

Draft submission in week 4 on 8 October by 1800hrs in Turnitin via Moodle Final submission in week 5 on 15 October by 1800hrs in Turnitin via Moodle

Assignment Coursework Brief.

The assessment is an individual piece of work, and should be written in essay format, and should be 2,000 words +/- 10%.

This assignment will develop your skills in analytical thinking and writing and your ability to analyze theory and consider how it can be applied in practice. As highlighted above, the content of the essay answers should draw upon relevant theory and models, and organizational examples that have been gathered from a range of sources.

Examples of such are; textbooks, academic journal articles, trade press such as People Management which is published by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development or CIPD; surveys and research reports; media reports from newspapers and the internet – but do not overdo your selection of material from these latter sources.

Draft submission

You are required to prepare a draft/essay plan of your first area of exploration to submit via Moodle and Turnitin by the specified deadline. The draft should be no more than 300 words and include a minimum of 1 academic reference presented using the Harvard Referencing System.

The Lecturer will provide you with formative feedback and return the draft to you the following week during a consultation session. From this feedback you can then review and learn from your strengths and areas for improvement to make amendments before the final submission.

Final submission

To be submitted via Moodle and Turnitin by the specified deadline. The final essay should be 2000 words +/- 10% and include a minimum of 10 academic reference presented using the Harvard Referencing System.

In your Essay you are specifically required to

  • Analyze a minimum of two theoretical concepts and explain how should be implemented and practiced in the Tourism, Hospitality or Events industry.
  • Demonstrate the organizational benefits of implementing the selected theoretical concepts
  • Identify problems an organization would face if such theoretical concepts are not practiced organization wide.
  • Use industry applied examples to further support your arguments and justify your answers.
  • Demonstrate depth of reading and use of literature to support your arguments
  • Correctly use the Harvard Referencing System

Some examples of theoretical concepts covered in this module are that you should be discussing in your essay are:

  • Human Resources Management Theories (focus on one model)
    • Human Resource planning and Job Analysis
    • Resourcing the Organization (Recruitment and Selection)
    • Managing Performance
    • Reward and recognition

Additional Submission Guidelines

Students must follow submission guidelines as indicated in the Student Submission Guidelines document uploaded in Moodle.

Individual essay – MARKING SCHEME AND FEEDBACK FORM

CriteriaCommentsMarks
Draft submission /10
Introduction and objectives /10
Analysis and evaluation of minimum 2 HRM concepts and their application to the T.H.E. context /30
Links to theoretical models and ideas /20
Coherence of argument /10
Conclusion /10
Depth of reading and correct use of literature to support arguments, use of Harvard Referencing System /10
TOTAL /100

Overall comments:

Assessment 2 – On-line Exam (50%)

Submission deadlines:

Submission in week 10 on Tuesday, 17 November from 1300hrs to 1500hrs in Turnitin via Moodle

You will have 2 hours to answer 3 essay questions out of a choice of 5

It will enhance your answers to use HRM theories and models and link it to practical examples that are appropriate to THE sectors or business.

Write approximately 1000 words per essay response.

You will be given a date and a time slot to complete your EXAM online from home. Questions will be made available in Moodle at the allocated time and you will have 2 hours to complete your EXAM. You will be given additional 10 Minutes reading time. Moodle will be accessible 20 Minutes before and 20 Minutes after the allocated 2 hours examination time

Answer need to be typed in a word documents and will need to be uploaded into Moodle/Turnitin.

Although you are allowed to consult your notes during the exam (open book exam) you are reminded that a maximum of 25% Turnitin similarity score is considered acceptable. You will be allowed to submit your answers to Turnitin only once.

Additional Examination Guidelines

Detailed additional examination guidelines will be given closer to the date to all students

Marking Criteria

90-100% A quite exceptional and outstanding answer, providing insights which would not be available publicly, and would, with some editing, be publishable. In addition to the features of the next section, this range is distinguished by superior organization, economic use of language and totally comprehensive, given the conditions of the exercise.

80-89% An answer which demonstrates an excellent understanding of the question and of the complexity of the issues involved. There is a sound basis of relevant factual knowledge and/or the theoretical issues involved. Most of the important issues are dealt with in a detailed, specific and systematic way. There is either some measure of original thinking in the answer or an accurate and comprehensive account is given in a way which demonstrates understanding, for example by structuring the material such that it could not have been based just on reproduction of lecture notes and programme material. Evidence of creativity, critical approach, and wide reading beyond the core subject matter.

70-79% As above but a slightly less consistently excellent level. Alternatively, this range of mark may be given for an answer which, while not having original insights, gives comprehensive and accurate coverage of the issues at a high level throughout the answer, without significant omissions or errors.

60-69% An answer which demonstrates a clear understanding of the question and grasp of the complexity of the issues involved. There is a sound basis of relevant factual knowledge and/or of theoretical issues involved, with few significant errors. The issues involved are dealt with in a systematic way. Some of the issues may be limited in critical approach but organized to display a comprehensive understanding and factual information essentially complete.

50-59% An answer which demonstrates an understanding of the major or basic issues in the question. There is a basis of factual knowledge and/or of relevant theoretical issues. Although some errors may be present, the overall framework of the answer is sensible and accurate. Most of all the issues may be dealt with at the level of obviously available programme material given to the student. The answer shows planning in its construction, with a clear train of thought or development of argument present. Average competent performance, well presented, demonstrating understanding of most of the essential issues.

40-49% An answer which demonstrates a limited understanding of the major or basic issues in the question. There is some relevant factual knowledge and/or awareness of theoretical issues, but it is patchy. A few significant errors may be present. The answer is not well planned, with little development of argument, and often much irrelevant material is present. Lacks clarity of expression. The lower range (40-45) would include an answer where relevant factual knowledge and/or awareness of theoretical issues is poor and confused, but not absent. Many significant errors may be present. The answer is poorly planned, with little clear train of thought or development of argument, and much of the answer may be irrelevant.

38-39% An answer which fails to demonstrate any appreciable understanding of the major issues or basic issues of the question. Relevant factual knowledge and/or awareness of theoretical issues, if present at all, is very poor and confused and very limited. Many significant errors may be present. Much or all of the answer may be irrelevant. Poorly organized and very limited in scope.

30-37% Attempts an answer, but relevant factual knowledge and/or awareness of theoretical issues is very poor and confused, and very limited with many significant errors.

10-29% Not clear that an answer is properly attempted. Only a few minor points made at all relevant to the answer and these may be superficial. Most material is irrelevant or incorrect.

1-9% An answer that is so short or irrelevant that only a few marks are justified. For example, one or two points may be made which show some peripheral awareness of certain possibly relevant issues.

Graduate Attributes

It is School policy that Graduate Skills should be embedded into module delivery and assessment. The interactive nature of the seminars fulfils most of the requirements by encouraging discussion, organisation and communication, and group discussion. By examining the assessment criteria, you will note that Graduate Skills are also contained within them. More specifically, the following Skills are included in the module overall:

  • Problem Solving and Analytical Ability
    • Inter-Personal Skills and Networking
    • Global Citizenship (Diversity and Sustainability)
    • Flexibility and Adaptability (Life-Long learning)
    • Effective Communication
    • Creativity and Innovation

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